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Title Name Amity Solve Assignment BA Economic for Agricultural Economics of India
University AMITY
Service Type Assignment
Course BA(Economics)
Semister Semester-IV Cource: BA(Economics)
Short Name or Subject Code Agricultural Economics of India
Commerce line item Type Semester-IV Cource: BA(Economics)
Product Assignment of BA(Economics) Semester-IV (AMITY)

Solved Assignment


  Questions :-

                                                                                                                                Agricultural Economics of India

 Assignment A

  1. Explain the prospects of agricultural marketing?
  1. Explain the classification of agricultural market infrastructure?

6. What are the various drivers of growth in agriculture? Explain any two?

 

 

 

 

Case Detail: 

Answer the following questions:

Please give your answer in at least 25 words and press save and continue button.

  1. Why is there a need to have pro-agriculture macro policies?
  2. Write short notes on PDS and MSP?
  1. Recapitulate on problems and reasons for deceleration in agriculture?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Assignment C

Question No.  1           Marks - 10

Which sector is the backbone of Indian economy?   

 Options          

  1. Service Sector
  2. Financial Sector 
  3. Tourism Sector
  4. Agriculture Sector

 

Question No.  2           Marks - 10

Which among the following is not a cereal?  

 Options          

  1. Rice
  2. Wheat 
  3. Gram
  4. Maize

 

Question No.  3           Marks - 10

Who announced the introduction of National Food Security Act?  

 Options          

  1. Pranab Mukherjee
  2. Manmohan Singh
  3. Chidambaram
  4. ArunJaitley

 

Question No.  4           Marks - 10

When was NFSM launched?  

Options          

  1. Mid of 9th Five-Year Plan
  2. End of 10th Five-Year Plan
  3. Mid of 11th Five-Year Plan
  4. End of 11th Five-Year Plan

 

Question No.  5           Marks - 10

Who announced the launch of RashtriyaKrishiVikasYojana?          

Options          

  1. NarendraModi
  2. Manmohan Singh
  3. Atal Bihari Vajpayee
  4. K.Gujral

 

Question No.  6           Marks - 10

Which among the following does not belong to welfare schemes for the farmers?  

Options          

  1. Kisan Credit Card Scheme   
  2. SHG Bank Linkage Programme
  3. National Agricultural Insurance Scheme
  4. Employee Referral Scheme

 

Question No.  7           Marks - 10

When did the Government present Kisan Credit Card Scheme?      

Options          

  1. April 1853
  2. August 1998
  3. July 199
  4. November 1995

 

Question No.  8           Marks - 10

When was On Farm Water Management Scheme launched?

 Options          

  1. July 2000
  2. March 2002
  3. March 2004
  4. January 2004

 

Question No.  9           Marks - 10

When were Kisan Call Centres established? 

 Options          

  1. July 2000
  2. March 2002
  3. March 2004
  4. January 2004

 

Question No.  10         Marks - 10

When was Micro Irrigation launched?           

 Options          

  1. March 2002
  2. March 2004
  3. January 2004
  4. January 2006

 

Question No.  11         Marks - 10

Which is the Indian state with the largest area irrigated by tube wells, as per 2010 records?          

 Options          

  1. Bihar
  2. Punjab
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  12         Marks - 10

Which is the Indian state with the largest area irrigated by canals, as per 2009-10 records?

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Haryana
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  13         Marks - 10

Which is the largest rice producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?    

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Uttar Pradesh
  3. West Bengal
  4. Punjab

 

Question No.  14         Marks - 10

Which is the largest wheat producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?

 Options          

  1. Haryana
  2. Punjab
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Karnataka

 

Question No.  15         Marks - 10

Which is the largest maize producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Karnataka
  3. Maharashtra       
  1. Madhya Pradesh

 

Question No.  16         Marks - 10

Which is the largest jowar producing Indian state, as per 2011-12 records?

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Karnataka
  3. Madhya Pradesh
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  17         Marks - 10

Which is the largest bajra producing Indian state, as per 2011-12 records?  

 Options          

  1. Gujarat
  2. Haryana
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  18         Marks - 10

Which is the highest gram producing state, as per 2013-14 records?

Options          

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Maharashtra
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Gujarat

 

Question No.  19         Marks - 10

Which is the leading Indian state in cotton production, as per 2013-14 records?     

Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Gujarat
  3. Maharashtra
  4. Tamil Nadu

 

Question No.  20         Marks - 10

Which is the leading Indian state in sugarcane production, as per 2013-14 records?           

 Options          

  1. Maharashtra
  2. Tamil Nadu
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Andhra Pradesh

 

Question No.  21         Marks - 10

Which is the leading Indian state in groundnut production, as per 2013-14 records?          

Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Gujarat
  3. Tamil Nadu
  4. Karnataka

 

Question No.  22         Marks - 10

Which is the highest coconut producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?        

 Options          

  1. Karnataka
  2. Kerala
  3. Tamil Nadu
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  23         Marks - 10

Which state was the leading producer of fish in India during 2013-14 records?      

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Gujarat
  3. West Bengal
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  24         Marks - 10

Which is the highest food grain producing Indian state, as per 2013-14?    

 Options          

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Punjab
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  25         Marks - 10

Which is the highest coarse cereal producing Indian state, as per 2013-14? 

 Options          

  1. Karnataka
  2. Maharashtra
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  26         Marks - 10

Which is the highest Pulses producing Indian state, as per 2013-14?           

 Options          

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Maharashtra
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Rajasthan

 

Question No.  27         Marks - 10

Which is the highest Oilseeds producing Indian state, as per 2013-14?       

 Options          

  1. Gujarat
  2. Madhya Pradesh
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Andhra Pradesh

 

Question No.  28         Marks - 10

Which is the highest milk producing Indian state, as per 2012-13?  

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Punjab
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Rajasthan

 

Question No.  29         Marks - 10

In terms of geographical area India occupies what position in the world?   

 Options          

  1. Five
  2. six
  3. seven
  4. three

 

Question No.  30         Marks - 10

India does not share its boundary with which of the following countries?  

 Options          

  1. China
  2. Taiwan
  3. Burma
  4. Bhutan

 

Question No.  31         Marks - 10

Agriculture employs almost what percent of the Indian population?

 Options          

  1. 90
  2. 50
  3. 40
  4. 70

 

Question No.  32         Marks - 10

Which one of the following is a Kharif crop?

 Options          

  1. bajra
  2. wheat
  3. mustard
  4. barley

 

Question No.  33         Marks - 10

Which one of the following is a rabi crop?    

 Options          

  1. rice
  2. jowar
  3. cotton
  4. peas

 

Question No.  34         Marks - 10

Who is known as the ‘Father of White Revolution’?

 Options          

  1. V Kurien
  2. MS Swaminathan
  3. JP Narayan
  4. Baba Amte

 

Question No.  35         Marks - 10

Who was the chief architect of Green Revolution that significantly improved the agricultural yield in the country?         

 Options          

  1. MS Swaminathan
  2. VR KrishaAiyyar
  3. V Kurien
  4. Jawaharlal Nehru

 

Question No.  36         Marks - 10

The Chota Nagpur Plateau famous for its mineral deposits is in       

 Options          

  1. Uttar Pradesh
  2. Jharkhand
  3. Madhya Pradesh
  4. Bihar

 

Question No.  37         Marks - 10

The Mumbai Stock Exchange was set up in  

 Options          

  1. 1875
  2. 1900
  3. 1922
  4. 1947

 

Question No.  38         Marks - 10

What does the term NSDL stands for?         

 Options          

  1. National Securities Development Limited
  2. National Securities Depository Limited
  3. National Safety Development Limited
  4. Natural Safety Deployment Limited

 

Question No.  39         Marks - 10

Which is the highest egg producing Indian state, as per 2011-12?   

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Haryana
  3. Maharashtra
  4. Tamil Nadu

 

Question No.  40         Marks - 10

Which is the highest wool producing Indian state, as per 2009-10? 

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Jammu & Kashmir
  3. Karnataka
  4. Rajasthan
  Answers :-

                                                                                                                                Agricultural Economics of India

 Assignment A

  1. Explain the prospects of agricultural marketing?

Answer:- 

The National Commission on Agriculture defined agricultural marketing as a process which starts with a decision to produce a saleable farm commodity and it involves all aspects of market structure of system, both functional and institutional, based on technical and economic considerations and includes pre and post-harvest operations, assembling, grading, storage, transportation and distribution. The Indian council of Agricultural Research defined involvement of three important functions, namely (a) assembling (concentration) (b) preparation for consumption (processing) and (c) distribution.

Agricultural marketing can be defined as the commercial functions involved in transferring agricultural products consisting of farm, horticultural and other allied products from producer to consumer. Agricultural marketing also reflect another dimension from supply of produce from rural to rural and rural to urban and from rural to industrial consumers. In the olden days selling of agricultural produce was easy as it was direct between the producer to the consumer either for money or for barter. It brief, it was selling not marketing. In the modern world it became challenging with the latest technologies and involvement of middlemen, commission agents who keep their margins and move the produce further. As it is well known more the number of mediatory more will be the costs as each transaction incurs expenses and invites profits. Ultimately when it comes to the producer the cost of the produce goes up steep. In the entire process of marketing the producer gets the lowest price and the ultimate consumer pays the highest as the involvement of more middlemen in the entire distribution process. 4Ps’, the acronym for price, product, place and promotion is the core principle of marketing. In the case of agricultural marketing in India it is not exactly the marketing in the literal sense and we can call it as ‘distributive handling’ and to go further we may call it as ‘distributive handling’ of agricultural produce as there are number of intermediaries who are involved in marketing the agricultural produce. However with the liberalization, privatization and globalization the economic scenario in India has changed drastically and tremendously. As a result we have noticed the changes in the ‘distributive handling’ and again it reinvented and evolved as agricultural marketing. There are several challenges involved in marketing of agricultural produce. There is limited access to the market information, literacy level among the farmers is low, multiple channels of distribution that eats away the pockets of both farmers and consumers. The government funding of farmers is still at nascent stage and most of the small farmers still depend on the local moneylenders who are leeches and charge high rate of interest. There are too many vultures that eat away the benefits that the farmers are supposed to get. Although we say that technology have improved but it has not gone to the rural levels as it is confined to urban areas alone.

 

 

 

  1. Explain the classification of agricultural market infrastructure?

Answer:-

India is an agricultural country and one third population depends on the agricultural sector directly or indirectly. Agriculture remains as the main stray of the Indian economy since times immemorial. Indian agriculture contribution to the national gross domestic product (GDP) is about 25 per cent. With food being the crowning need of mankind, much emphasis has been on commercialising agricultural production. For this reason, adequate production and even distribution of food has of late become a high priority global concern.

Agricultural marketing is mainly the buying and selling of agricultural products. In earlier days when the village economy was more or less self-sufficient the marketing of agricultural products presented no difficulty as the farmer sold his produce to the consumer on a cash or barter basis.

Today´s agricultural marketing has to undergo a series of exchanges or transfers from one person to another before it reaches the consumer. There are three marketing functions involved in this, i.e., assembling, preparation for consumption and distribution. Selling on any agricultural produce depends on some couple of factors like the demand of the product at that time, availability of storage etc. The products may be sold directly in the market or it may be stored locally for the time being. Moreover, it may be sold as it is gathered from the field or it may be cleaned, graded and processed by the farmer or the merchant of the village. Sometime processing is done because consumers want it, or sometimes to conserve the quality of that product. The task of distribution system is to match the supply with the existing demand by whole selling and retailing in various points of different markets like primary, secondary or terminal markets.

Most of the agricultural products in India are sold by farmers in the private sector to moneylenders (to whom the farmer may be indebted) or to village traders. Products are sold in various ways. For example, it might be sold at a weekly village market in the farmer´s village or in a neighbouring village. If these outlets are not available, then produce might be sold at irregularly held markets in a nearby village or town, or in the mandi.

In India, there are several central government organisations, who are involved in agricultural marketing like, Commission of Agricultural Costs and Prices, Food Corporation of India, Cotton Corporation of India, Jute Corporation of India, etc. There are also specialised marketing bodies for rubber, tea, coffee, tobacco, spices and vegetables.

Under the Agricultural Produce (grading and marketing) Act of 1937, more than forty primary commodities are compulsorily graded for export and voluntarily graded for internal consumption. Although the regulation of commodity markets is a function of state government, the directorate of marketing and inspection provides marketing and inspection services and financial aid down to the village level to help set up commodity grading centres in selected markets.

As we have a tradition of agricultural production, marketing and allied commercial activities, now it is the time for us to brainstorm and come out with new ideas of value added services. These value added services will give the existing agricultural engine a new dimension. The next logical step could be food-processing which not only could be another revenue generating area but also can provide lots of full-time employment to our youths. With the changing agricultural scenario and global competition, there is a need of exploiting the available resources at maximum level.

There was a survey undertaken by the directorate of marketing and inspection in the ministry of agriculture in 1970-71 and 1971-72, of five hundred regulated markets was, with a view to assessing the adequacy and efficiency of the existing regulated markets and highlighting their drawbacks and deficiencies and suggesting measures to develop them. One of the most important drawbacks has been the inadequate financial resources of some of the market committees. During the fourth plan, a central sector scheme was drawn up by the ministry of agriculture to provide a grant at 20 per cent of the cost of development of market, subject to a maximum of Rs. 2 lakhs. The balance will have to be provided by the commercial banks.

Another important development in the field of regulated markets is the keen interest taken by the International Development Agency (IDA) in the development of the infrastructure in regulated markets. The IDA is financing the development of infrastructure in 50 markets of Bihar.

There are also some good news on the front of irrigation, rural infrastructure, restoring water bodies and water harvesting. Another action initiated to improve the governance of the Small Farmers Agri-business Consortium (SFAC) including the appointment of a banker as the chief executive; necessary additional capital to be provided to SFAC.

 

 

 

  1. What are the various drivers of growth in agriculture? Explain any two?

Answer:-

The agriculture sector has been historically perceived by the governments more as a vote bank rather than an engine of growth. The Indian government and policy makers equated economic progress with the services and manufacturing sectors and considered agriculture as the also-ran of the Indian economy. While urban India flourished and people living in the cities got richer, hundreds of millions of farmers remained mired in poverty. The Indian agriculture sector seemed stagnating.

This trend, however, is now gradually undergoing a change. The farm is now back. IMARC Group, one of the world´s leading research and advisory firms, finds that lurking fears of food shortage, rethinking on antipoverty priorities and the recent economic slowdown are among the factors that are causing a dramatic shift in the Indian economic policy in favour of greater support for agriculture. The Indian agriculture sector is now moving towards another green revolution. The transformations in the sector are being induced by factors like newfound interest of the organised sector, new and improved technologies, farming becoming more mechanised, new markets and demands, easy credit facilities, rapid growth of contract farming, agriculture friendly policies from the government, etc. Agriculture is now evolving from just a traditional way of life to a professionally managed industry - the agriculture industry.

Global-scale drivers

(i) International trade and globalization of markets

International agricultural trade has increased 10-fold since the 1960s owing to more open trade policies, market liberalization in many developing countries and advances in communications and transport systems. Some important consequences have been some developing countries have taken advantage of new trade opportunities to increase exports of non-traditional products such as flowers, fruits, wine and fish. Good examples are Chile, South Africa, Thailand, Costa Rica and Kenya.

(ii) Low world prices

The remarkable increase in the productivity of global agriculture achieved in recent decades has also led to lower production costs that, where markets are competitive, have been passed on to consumers through lower prices. Low-cost producers have also expanded their market reach through greater opportunities for international trade. Low prices are good for consumers, especially poor urban consumers in developing countries. On the contrary, they are a disincentive for farmers.

(iii) High energy prices

High energy prices can have mixed environmental impacts. In mechanized farming systems, they may encourage lower tillage practices that reduce soil erosion. However, in many poor countries, they may contribute to additional deforestation and land degradation through greater use of wood, manures and crop by-products as sources of household energy in rural areas.

(iv) OECD agricultural policies

Although many developing countries have liberalized and opened up their agricultural markets to international trade in recent years (often as part of International Monetary Fund (IMF)/World Bank-supported structural adjustment programmes), the protectionist agricultural polices of most OECD countries are increasingly recognized as discriminating against the well-being of farmers in developing countries.

Country-scale drivers

(i) Per capita income and urbanization

Growth in national per capita income leads to major transformations within the agricultural sector.

  1. Agriculture´s share in national income and employment falls as countries grow richer and diversify into manufacturing and service sector activities, even though agricultural output and employment typically keep growing until quite late in the development process.
  2. As per capita incomes rise, labour becomes more expensive relative to land and capital and small farms begin to get squeezed out by larger and more capitalized farms that become better placed to compete.
  3. As per capita incomes rise, consumers diversify their diets and demand higher-value livestock products, fruits and vegetables and relatively less food staples. They also demand higher-quality and safer products, and more processed and pre-cooked foods.

(ii) Changing market chains

Marketing chains are changing in countries of all types with trade liberalization and globalization As a result, developing country farmers are increasingly being challenged to compete in markets that are much more consumer driven and demanding in terms of the type, quality and safety of agricultural products, more concentrated and integrated, and much more open to international competition.

(iii) Shifts in public policy

In developing countries, fundamental shifts in the internationally accepted development paradigm have transformed public sector policies towards the agricultural sector. As part of the IMF/World Bank-led structural adjustment programs of the 1980s and early 1990s, state agencies in many countries have been removed from providing direct marketing and service functions to farmers, supposedly creating opportunities for the private sector to take over as a more efficient supplier. This change in paradigm may be working for the larger national good in countries with reasonable infrastructure and effective legal and regulatory frameworks, especially for high-value markets.

 

 

 

 

Case Detail: 

Answer the following questions:

Please give your answer in at least 25 words and press save and continue button.

  1. Why is there a need to have pro-agriculture macro policies?

Answer:-

In India, economic growth improved significantly during the past two and half decades, particularly in the post-reform period, India is considered as one of the fastest growing economies in the world. However, the exclusion problems have not been seriously addressed by the government programmes and strategies. The experience of the economic reforms during the past 15 years indicates that while there have been improvements in economic growth, foreign exchange, IT revolution, export growth, etc., the income distribution has been unequal and only some sections of the population have benefited more from higher growth and prosperity. In other words, real development in terms of growth shared by all sections of the population has not taken place. We have problems of poverty, unemployment, inequalities in access to health and education and poor performance of agriculture sector. In recent decades, the context within which agriculture policy has to be developed and implemented has undergone fundamental changes. The relationships operated for much of the 1960s and 1970s have changed. Globalization policies in the 1980s and particularly during 1990s and beyond have created many challenges for agriculture in developing countries. Some of the consequences and impacts of globalization are: exposure of domestic agriculture to international competition, growth of non-agricultural sector and its impact on demand for agricultural products, urban middle class life-style changes including diets, rising food imports in developing countries, competitiveness and diversification of domestic production systems, vertical integration of the food supply chain, etc. (Pinglai, 2006). Because of demographic pressures, there has been significant increase in small and marginal farm holdings. These farmers have to face the challenges of globalization. Risk and uncertainty have also increased as cultivation has spread to marginal lands. The diversification of agriculture has also raised concerns on food security. In recent years, there has been a concern regarding increase in global food prices. Rise in crude oil prices has increased agricultural costs also. Increased use of food crops in bio-fuels also has pushed up their demand. The USA used 20% of its maize production for bio-fuels; Brazil used 50% of sugarcane for bio-fuels; and the European Union used 68% of its vegetable oil production for bio-fuels. Such large usages, by reducing the availability of these products for food and feed, exerted pressure on prices. Food prices also increased due to low output stocks. International prices of wheat, rice and maize increased significantly during the past two years. This is another challenge for India in maintaining its food security.

Input Growth in Agriculture

One of the reasons for the decline in output growth and farm business income was low yield growth during post-reform period. The reduction in yield growth, in turn, was largely a result of reduction in input growth in agriculture. Sen and Bhatia (2004) have shown that the growth of per hectare input-use at constant prices decelerated from 3.66% per annum in the 1980s to 0.94% per annum in the 1990s. The same study reveals that combination of input price increase and inadequate expansion of public infrastructure could be responsible for the deceleration in growth of input-use. Real input prices (deflated by CPIAL) declined at the rate of (-) 1.94% per annum during the 1980s but had risen at 0.33% per annum during the 1990s.

Terms of Trade in Agriculture

The reform strategy for agriculture relied on making terms of trade (TOT) favourable to the sector by reducing the protection to industry and trade liberalization. These favourable relative prices are expected to attract investible resources into agriculture and lead to higher growth of agricultural production.

 

 

 

  1. Write short notes on PDS and MSP?

Answer:-

Minimum Support Price is the price at which government purchases crops from the farmers, whatever may be the price for the crops. Minimum Support Price is an important part of India’s agricultural price policy.

The MSP helps to incentivize the framers and thus ensures adequate food grains production in the country. I give sufficient remuneration to the farmers, provides food grains supply to buffer stocks and supports the food security programme through PDS and other programmes.

Procurement Price.

Sometimes, the government procures at a higher price than the MSP. Here, the price will be referred as procurement price. The procurement price will be announced soon after the harvest. Normally, the procurement price will be higher than the MSP, but lower than the market price. The price at which the procured and buffer stocked food grains are provided through the PDS is called as issue price. The minimum support prices are announced by the Government of India at the beginning of the sowing season for certain crops on the basis of the recommendations of the Commission for Agricultural Costs and Prices (CACP). Support prices generally affect farmers’ decisions indirectly, regarding land allocation to crops, quantity of the crops to be produced etc. It is in this angle that the MSP becomes a big incentive for the farmers to produce more quantity.

Government’s agricultural policy has three important components- the MSP, Buffer Stocks and issue of food grains through the PDS. The interconnectivity between the three is very clear. MSP helps to procure adequate food grains through FCI, state agencies and cooperatives. The PDS network through the policy of issue price delivers it to the weaker sections.

MSP is price fixed by Government of India to protect the farmers against excessive fall in price during bumper production years. The minimum support prices are a guarantee price for their produce from the Government.

 The objective of the MSP is thus to ensure remunerative prices to the growers for by encouraging higher investment and production. It also aims to bring a balanced realization of sufficient food production and consumption needs at the same ensuring adequate and affordable food grains to all the people.

 

 

  1. Recapitulate on problems and reasons for deceleration in agriculture?

Answer:-

Since the inception of economic reforms, Indian economy has achieved a remarkable rate of growth. This performance, to a large extent, was driven by service sector and improvements in the secondary sector and bypassed the agricultural sector, which showed sharp deceleration in the growth rate. Given the importance of the sector for employment and rural development, the declining trend in agricultural growth has emerged as a major concern for researchers and policymakers. A large number of studies have enquired into the growth process of agricultural sector and has criticised the neo-liberal policy regime for a general neglect of the sector. The sector has recorded wide variations in yield and productivity and there was a shift towards cash crop cultivations. Moreover, agricultural indebtedness pushed several farming households into poverty and some of them resorted to extreme measures like suicides. In this context, the present paper reviews the performance of the Indian agriculture since reforms and compares it with pre-reforms conditions. A systematic and critical review of literature is presented to comprehend the poor performance of Indian agriculture. The review focuses on the pattern and determinants (price and non-price) of agricultural growth and evaluates the influence of policy and environmental factors on its performance. The study identifies that, in the post reform period, there has been an increase in prices of cash crops and the cropping pattern changes towards non-food grains have a significant effect on growth. The paper also concludes that much of the slowdown in agriculture is caused due to factors like infrastructure, technology and environmental factors, lack of political commitment and poor implementation of policies. One of the paradoxes of the Indian economy is that the decline in the share of agricultural workers in total workers has been slower than the decline in the share of agriculture in GDP. The share of agriculture and allied activities in GDP declined from 57.7 per cent in 1950-51 to 25 per cent in 1999-00 and further to 20 per cent in 2004-05. The share of agricultural workers in total workers has declined slowly, from 75.9 per cent in 1961 to 59.9 per cent in 1999-00 and further to 56.7 per cent in 2004-05. Between 1961 and 2004-05, there has been a decline of 34-percentage points in the share of agriculture in GDP, while the decline in share of agriculture in employment has been of 19 percentage points only.

One of the reasons for the decline in output growth and farm business income was low yield growth in the post-reform period. The reduction in yield growth, in turn, was largely a result of reduction in input growth in agriculture. Sen and Bhatia (2004) have shown that the growth of per hectare input-use at constant prices decelerated from 3.66 per cent per annum during the 1980s to 0.94 per cent per annum during the 1990s. The same study has revealed that combination of input price increase and inadequate expansion of public infrastructure could be responsible for the deceleration in growth of inputs.

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 Assignment C

Question No.  1           Marks - 10

Which sector is the backbone of Indian economy?   

 Options          

  1. Service Sector
  2. Financial Sector 
  3. Tourism Sector
  4. Agriculture Sector

 

Question No.  2           Marks - 10

Which among the following is not a cereal?  

 Options          

  1. Rice
  2. Wheat 
  3. Gram
  4. Maize

 

Question No.  3           Marks - 10

Who announced the introduction of National Food Security Act?  

 Options          

  1. Pranab Mukherjee
  2. Manmohan Singh
  3. Chidambaram
  4. ArunJaitley

 

Question No.  4           Marks - 10

When was NFSM launched?  

Options          

  1. Mid of 9th Five-Year Plan
  2. End of 10th Five-Year Plan
  3. Mid of 11th Five-Year Plan
  4. End of 11th Five-Year Plan

 

Question No.  5           Marks - 10

Who announced the launch of RashtriyaKrishiVikasYojana?          

Options          

  1. NarendraModi
  2. Manmohan Singh
  3. Atal Bihari Vajpayee
  4. K.Gujral

 

Question No.  6           Marks - 10

Which among the following does not belong to welfare schemes for the farmers?  

Options          

  1. Kisan Credit Card Scheme   
  2. SHG Bank Linkage Programme
  3. National Agricultural Insurance Scheme
  4. Employee Referral Scheme

 

Question No.  7           Marks - 10

When did the Government present Kisan Credit Card Scheme?      

Options          

  1. April 1853
  2. August 1998
  3. July 199
  4. November 1995

 

Question No.  8           Marks - 10

When was On Farm Water Management Scheme launched?

 Options          

  1. July 2000
  2. March 2002
  3. March 2004
  4. January 2004

 

Question No.  9           Marks - 10

When were Kisan Call Centres established? 

 Options          

  1. July 2000
  2. March 2002
  3. March 2004
  4. January 2004

 

Question No.  10         Marks - 10

When was Micro Irrigation launched?           

 Options          

  1. March 2002
  2. March 2004
  3. January 2004
  4. January 2006

 

Question No.  11         Marks - 10

Which is the Indian state with the largest area irrigated by tube wells, as per 2010 records?          

 Options          

  1. Bihar
  2. Punjab
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  12         Marks - 10

Which is the Indian state with the largest area irrigated by canals, as per 2009-10 records?

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Haryana
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  13         Marks - 10

Which is the largest rice producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?    

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Uttar Pradesh
  3. West Bengal
  4. Punjab

 

Question No.  14         Marks - 10

Which is the largest wheat producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?

 Options          

  1. Haryana
  2. Punjab
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Karnataka

 

Question No.  15         Marks - 10

Which is the largest maize producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Karnataka
  3. Maharashtra       
  1. Madhya Pradesh

 

Question No.  16         Marks - 10

Which is the largest jowar producing Indian state, as per 2011-12 records?

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Karnataka
  3. Madhya Pradesh
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  17         Marks - 10

Which is the largest bajra producing Indian state, as per 2011-12 records?  

 Options          

  1. Gujarat
  2. Haryana
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  18         Marks - 10

Which is the highest gram producing state, as per 2013-14 records?

Options          

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Maharashtra
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Gujarat

 

Question No.  19         Marks - 10

Which is the leading Indian state in cotton production, as per 2013-14 records?     

Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Gujarat
  3. Maharashtra
  4. Tamil Nadu

 

Question No.  20         Marks - 10

Which is the leading Indian state in sugarcane production, as per 2013-14 records?           

 Options          

  1. Maharashtra
  2. Tamil Nadu
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Andhra Pradesh

 

Question No.  21         Marks - 10

Which is the leading Indian state in groundnut production, as per 2013-14 records?          

Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Gujarat
  3. Tamil Nadu
  4. Karnataka

 

Question No.  22         Marks - 10

Which is the highest coconut producing Indian state, as per 2013-14 records?        

 Options          

  1. Karnataka
  2. Kerala
  3. Tamil Nadu
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  23         Marks - 10

Which state was the leading producer of fish in India during 2013-14 records?      

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Gujarat
  3. West Bengal
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  24         Marks - 10

Which is the highest food grain producing Indian state, as per 2013-14?    

 Options          

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Punjab
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Maharashtra

 

Question No.  25         Marks - 10

Which is the highest coarse cereal producing Indian state, as per 2013-14? 

 Options          

  1. Karnataka
  2. Maharashtra
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Uttar Pradesh

 

Question No.  26         Marks - 10

Which is the highest Pulses producing Indian state, as per 2013-14?           

 Options          

  1. Madhya Pradesh
  2. Maharashtra
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Rajasthan

 

Question No.  27         Marks - 10

Which is the highest Oilseeds producing Indian state, as per 2013-14?       

 Options          

  1. Gujarat
  2. Madhya Pradesh
  3. Rajasthan
  4. Andhra Pradesh

 

Question No.  28         Marks - 10

Which is the highest milk producing Indian state, as per 2012-13?  

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Punjab
  3. Uttar Pradesh
  4. Rajasthan

 

Question No.  29         Marks - 10

In terms of geographical area India occupies what position in the world?   

 Options          

  1. Five
  2. six
  3. seven
  4. three

 

Question No.  30         Marks - 10

India does not share its boundary with which of the following countries?  

 Options          

  1. China
  2. Taiwan
  3. Burma
  4. Bhutan

 

Question No.  31         Marks - 10

Agriculture employs almost what percent of the Indian population?

 Options          

  1. 90
  2. 50
  3. 40
  4. 70

 

Question No.  32         Marks - 10

Which one of the following is a Kharif crop?

 Options          

  1. bajra
  2. wheat
  3. mustard
  4. barley

 

Question No.  33         Marks - 10

Which one of the following is a rabi crop?    

 Options          

  1. rice
  2. jowar
  3. cotton
  4. peas

 

Question No.  34         Marks - 10

Who is known as the ‘Father of White Revolution’?

 Options          

  1. V Kurien
  2. MS Swaminathan
  3. JP Narayan
  4. Baba Amte

 

Question No.  35         Marks - 10

Who was the chief architect of Green Revolution that significantly improved the agricultural yield in the country?         

 Options          

  1. MS Swaminathan
  2. VR KrishaAiyyar
  3. V Kurien
  4. Jawaharlal Nehru

 

Question No.  36         Marks - 10

The Chota Nagpur Plateau famous for its mineral deposits is in       

 Options          

  1. Uttar Pradesh
  2. Jharkhand
  3. Madhya Pradesh
  4. Bihar

 

Question No.  37         Marks - 10

The Mumbai Stock Exchange was set up in  

 Options          

  1. 1875
  2. 1900
  3. 1922
  4. 1947

 

Question No.  38         Marks - 10

What does the term NSDL stands for?         

 Options          

  1. National Securities Development Limited
  2. National Securities Depository Limited
  3. National Safety Development Limited
  4. Natural Safety Deployment Limited

 

Question No.  39         Marks - 10

Which is the highest egg producing Indian state, as per 2011-12?   

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Haryana
  3. Maharashtra
  4. Tamil Nadu

 

Question No.  40         Marks - 10

Which is the highest wool producing Indian state, as per 2009-10? 

 Options          

  1. Andhra Pradesh
  2. Jammu & Kashmir
  3. Karnataka
  4. Rajasthan

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